Wedding Traditions Becoming Nontraditional

By Amber Blondin, VOWS Planner/Designer

If you’ve been a guest at a wedding recently, chances are you've noticed the absence of a few long-time traditions. Here are some old—and new—traditions we’ve seen evolve over the years here at VOWS:

Blusher Veil:  Dating back to Greek and Roman times, a blusher veil was believed to shield the bride from evil spirits. It was later embraced by cultures with arranged marriages to prevent the groom from changing his mind upon seeing his bride. While some brides prefer to still honor this tradition, it’s easy to see why this tradition has become obsolete.

First Look
First Look

First Look:  Similar to the blusher veil, the tradition of waiting to see each other until the ceremony has become less common over time. More often than not, couples are choosing to see each other before the ceremony at a special location, to ensure sufficient time for photographs and more time together on their special day.

Wedding Cake:  In place of the traditional multi-tiered wedding cake, many couples are instead treating guests to a variety of their favorite desserts, and include a smaller ceremonial cake for that cake cutting tradition that is still alive and well.

Pinterest
Pinterest

Personalization:  From monogrammed everything, to signature cocktails, and custom cake toppers resembling the bride & groom (and sometimes their pets!), couples are getting a lot more creative these days. We have Pinterest to thank (and sometimes blame!) for the endless wedding inspiration from across the globe.

engagement ring
engagement ring

Rings:  Though the wedding band symbolizes a present commitment of marriage and the engagement ring represents a future commitment to wed, these days, many brides are rocking just one blinged-out, engagement ring in lieu of both traditionally worn rings.

bouquet toss
bouquet toss

Bouquet & Garter Toss:  Originating in the 14th century, the bouquet toss allowed the bride to share her good luck and fortune with others. However, in the 21st century, many consider this tradition a little awkward by calling out the (sometimes, very few) single ladies. Even more awkward – the garter toss. How many of us have cringed watching a groom remove the garter with his teeth?

Anniversary Dance: This modern alternative to the bouquet and garter toss is quickly becoming a new wedding tradition. The emcee invites all married couples to the dance floor and couples are eliminated based on the number of years they’ve been married. By the end of the song, the winning duo is the longest married couple. The bouquet is then gifted to the wife.

We’d love to hear from you! In the comment field, tell us about the wedding traditions you’re either happy or sad to see go. Any new traditions you’re hoping to see more of?